3D Production Pipeline: Lighting, Rendering, & Compositing

While 3D modelling (especially in 3DS max), I learn that people have the ability to control the light whatever and wherever they want. People can set the light like the sun and see how much light or glow is required for their scene (Boudon, 2013). With a proper light adjustment, the scene will then look realistic and alive (“The process of 3D animation,” n.d.). Lighting in 3D modeling act as a simulator to see how lighting works in real life. The set up for the light is usually in three points (or more). The three-point lighting is a standard technique that was generally used for cinematography and photography. The three-points are key light, fill light, and back/rim light. Key light is the light that shines the brightest upon the model. The fill light reduces or lowers the deep shadows cast by the key light and it should be on the opposite of the key light’s position. Rim or back light adds a little glow on the back or top of the 3D model to make it more realistic because if not, then the shadows will envelope around the model, and it will look bad.  It’s approach is to properly light up the model in a compelling way and make it look almost simple, but also nice to see. The three-point lighting is really useful in illuminating the model as a studio type lighting effect (Masters, 2014).

mtbl_3point_2.jpgImage:  http://www.marmoset.co/wp-content/uploads/mtbl_3point_2.jpg

After lighting the 3D models’ surfaces, rendering takes place as it is the last step in 3D modeling and animation. Rendering is a process when a 3D animation is assembling the data or output files, and its animated action scenes to make it into a viewable result when exported. (Sanders, 2015). Before exporting the animated project, the scenes must be checked to see if there’s any feature that needs to be adjusted such as the lighting effect, the camera shots, or the environment till you get what you desire your project to be (Boudon, 2013).

7a39acb0643f10e2a820f014dc8de265

 

.Image: http://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/7a39acb0643f10e2a820f014dc8de265.jpg

Once the renders are finalized and exported, the rendered images will be brought to compositing programs to be edited and be finalized into a film. Compositing is usually processed by adjusting the light to form the final scene and by rotoscoping (Gulati, 2010), which is a process when 3D animation imitates a live action video. For example, an actor performs some actions scenes while the animator creates a digital character that mimics the actor’s performance.

 

compositing2.png

Image: https://movingthingsandsound.files.wordpress.com/2011/08/compositing2.png

 

References:

    1. Gulati, P. (2010, June 9). Step-by-step: How to make an animated movie. Retrieved October 20, 2016, from envatotuts+, https://cgi.tutsplus.com/articles/step-by-step-how-to-make-an-animated-movie–cg-3257
    2. Gulati, P. (2010, June 9). Step-by-step: How to make an animated movie. Retrieved October 20, 2016, from envatotuts+, https://cgi.tutsplus.com/articles/step-by-step-how-to-make-an-animated-movie–cg-3257
    3. Masters, M. (2014, January 26). Understanding Three-Point lighting | key light, fill light, rim light. Retrieved October 17, 2016, from Pluralsight, http://blog.digitaltutors.com/understanding-three-point-lighting/
    4. Sanders, A.-L. (2015, August 28). In Computer animation, what is rendering? Retrieved October 17, 2016, from Tech, http://animation.about.com/od/faqs/f/In-Computer-Animation-What-Is-Rendering.htm
    5. The process of 3D animation. Retrieved October 17, 2016, from mediafreaks, http://media-freaks.com/the-process-of-3d-animation/
    6. Willet, N., Lee, I., & Castaneda, O. (2011, March 29). Animation production pipeline. Retrieved October 17, 2016, from PhysBAM, http://physbam.stanford.edu/cs448x/old/Animation_Production_Pipeline_(2d)_Nora_Willett.html
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s